Session IV now in progress. On the "new" canine flu issue; it seems to be under control, with no fresh outbreaks of which we are aware. However, for the safety of your dogs, we urge that you have them vaccinated before taking classes with us. The vaccine is given in a series of two shots (to start) in a two week period. Upcoming events: Indoor Show 'n' Goes in our climate controled building, on 8/26, door opens at 7:30 am (see S'n'Go info on website). Nosework Seminars 9/9/17, attendance forms w/payment must be reach Diane by 8/26. New type of classes starting soon – AKC Trick Classes!

Therapy Dog Article in Star News

Group trains canines to help ailing humans

By Chris Mudarri   StarNews Correspondent    Published: Monday, October 11, 2010
Photo (unable to copy) by Matt Born:  Dave Temple and Kay Rodgers (center) work with Andrea Kelly and her dog Noah during a therapy test at the Azalea Dog Training Club in Hampstead. The test helps determine whether a dog will make a good therapy dog in a hospital or nursing facility. 

Note from webmaster:  Please note as our latest class was made up of 11 wonderful Teams, (which translates to Kay needing to supervise a total of thirty three visits for the group (three each Team, one-on-one supervised visits),  ADTC’s next Therapy dog class and testing will take place next spring. Contact Kay Rodgers through the ADTC website at http://adtc.us/site/

Now, on to Chris’ article!

“Let’s do walking,” therapy dog examiner Kay Rodgers said. “Slow … left turn … right turn.”  “Let’s go Tuck,” Lila McDowell said, taking her black Labrador Tucker through his paces. “Good job, Tuck!”

Tuck and McDowell approach a man in a wheelchair, a woman using a walker. Then another dog and owner passes them in the “hall” of the imaginary nursing facility set up in the Azalea Dog Training Club House in Hampstead.

Tester/observer through Therapy Dogs Incorporated, Rodgers hands out certification following testing in a classroom and observation during three on-site visits. She also organizes excursions to four nursing homes in the Cape Fear area.   Graduates just as often choose to go out on their own.

“One of our club members, he goes to New Hanover hospital every week,” Rodgers said, “and they spend a lot of time in the rehab section. He has a big black standard poodle that everybody knows.”

ADTC groups give “Dog Shows” in nursing facilities and other locations on request. Integrating humor and surprise into an act where dogs do tricks and jumps, run through tunnels and weave poles, Rodgers said they keep residents involved. After the demo, owners take dogs round to each resident to pet.

“There are times,” she said, “when I go into a room and get the feeling that this is the only person from the outside world they are going to see that day.”  She walks in and sees the smile. The hand goes out to pet the dog.  “It’s a feeling you can’t describe,” she said.

Therapy dog tests     The next therapy dog tests take place in late fall/early winter. Contact Kay Rodgers through the ADTC website at http://adtc.us/site/

Tester/observer through Therapy Dogs Incorporated, Rodgers hands out certification following testing in a classroom and observation during three on-site visits. She also organizes excursions to four nursing homes in the Cape Fear area.  Graduates just as often choose to go out on their own.  “One of our club members, he goes to New Hanover hospital every week,” Rodgers said, “and they spend a lot of time in the rehab section. He has a big black standard poodle that everybody knows.”

ADTC groups give “Dog Shows” in nursing facilities and other locations on request. Integrating humor and surprise into an act where dogs do tricks and jumps, run through tunnels and weave poles, Rodgers said they keep residents involved. After the demo, owners take dogs round to each resident to pet.  “There are times,” she said, “when I go into a room and get the feeling that this is the only person from the outside world they are going to see that day.”  She walks in and sees the smile. The hand goes out to pet the dog.  “It’s a feeling you can’t describe,” she said.

On the sidelines at ADTC, David Moore and Pepper, a Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever, wait for their turn. Moore said he does the training for fun and because it gives him better control of his dog. The seasoned pair have already passed several other exams such as Canine Good Citizen.

Rodgers, a Hampstead resident, emphasized safety for the animals during the test.  “Get into the position so you have control of your dog,” she said. “It’s called ‘Protect your dog at all times.’?”  As the session goes on, therapy dog veterans take turns offering anecdotes about issues, some common, others rare, such as how to avoid wheelchair accidents with the dog’s tail or what to do in a fire drill.

As a final step, Rodgers kneels down to stroke Tucker’s head, throat, and ears, then touches his paws and tail checking for reactions. She sees what she was looking for.  “Very good,” she said slapping her thighs and rising.  “OK, you passed,” she said.